The cost of treating hepatitis C (HCV) is likely to decline dramatically over the next decade in the United States, not because of cuts in drug prices but because the population in need of treatment will shrink by 2020 as a majority of patients will already have been treated, according to research by Jagpreet Chhatwal of Massachusetts General Hospital and colleagues presented at the 2015 AASLD Liver Meeting in San Francisco last month.

The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) awarded Scott Gazelle with their 2015 Outstanding Research Award. 

Doctors, patients and insurers have been struggling with how to determine who should be treated for hepatitis C now that effective but wildly expensive drugs can all but cure the disease. Treating prison inmates is a good investment that would save money in the long run, a study finds.

Continuous practice of Yoga and meditation can help one to reduce the need for healthcare services by 43%, says a new study by Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital Institute for Technology Assessment and the Benson-Henry Institute.

SAN FRANCISCO — Despite powerful new medications, the lack of screening and treatment capacity will make it difficult to eliminate the hepatitis C virus in the United States, according to projections presented here at the Liver Meeting 2015.

Current trends show that even after 2020, more than 500,000 people will be unaware that they are infected with hepatitis C, said Jagpreet Chhatwal, PhD, from the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston.